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SIGITE 2011 » Home for 12th Annual Conference on IT Education » Presentations

Presentations

    • Management, Structures and Tools to Scale up Personal Advising in Large Programming Courses
      Management, Structures and Tools to Scale up Personal Advising in Large Programming Courses We see programming in higher education as a craft that benefits from a direct contact, support and feedback from people who already master it. We have used a method called Extreme Apprenticeship (XA) to support our CS1 education. XA is based on a set of values that emphasize actual programming along with current best practices, coupled tightly with continuous feedback between the advisor and the student. As such, XA means ...

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    • Rethinking Advising: Developing a Proactive Culture to Improve Retention<br/>
      Rethinking Advising: Developing a Proactive Culture to Improve Retention
       
      In 2009 DePaul University’s College of Computing and Digital Media (DePaul CDM) discovered a significant lag in undergraduate retention rates as well as four, five and six-year graduation rates as compared to other major colleges at the university. DePaul CDM’s investment in online student service resources had over time caused the unintentional reinvention of the college advising office into one that supported a very limited number of ...

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    • How did Mathematics and Accounting Get So Many Women? What Can IT Disciplines Learn?
      How did Mathematics and Accounting Get So Many Women? What Can IT Disciplines Learn? This paper looks at two disciplines with similarities to Information Technology (IT) to see if any differences inform what should be done in IT to attract and retain women students. Disciplines that were traditionally male, mathematics and accounting, have succeeded in gaining equal numbers of male and female students. An overview of the gender transformation of Math and Accounting is given, with a list of shared strategies used to attract women. ...

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    • exhibitor - Learning in the GNU/Linux Community
      Learning in the GNU/Linux Community The GNU/Linux operating system was born from the Linux kernel developed by Linus Torvalds and GNU software packages developed by Richard Stallman and others at the GNU project. GNU/Linux quickly blossomed and has become a successful OS with a community of more than five million users and developers. The GNU/Linux paradigm encourages a sense of community and participation, building upon shared knowledge. The same tenets of collaboration and shared knowledge are espoused by academia and the educational system. Therefore, researchers conducted ...

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    • exhibitor - Free and Open Source Software Development of IT Systems
      Free and Open Source Software Development of IT Systems IT system development, integration, deployment, and administration benefit significantly from free and open source software (FOSS) tools and services. Affordability has been a compelling reason for adopting FOSS in computing curricula and equipping computing labs with support infrastructure. Using FOSS, however, is just the first step in taking advantage of how FOSS principles and practices can impact student learning in IT degree programs. ...

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    • exhibitor - Physics in Motion: An Interdisciplinary Project
      Physics in Motion: An Interdisciplinary Project Students in computer science and information technology should be engaged in solving real-world problems received from government and industry as well as those that expose them to various areas of application. This paper summarizes the results of an undergraduate research project between students in the Department of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) and the Department of Physics. ...

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    • exhibitor - Engaging High School Students in Computer Science via Challenging Applications
      Engaging High School Students in Computer Science via Challenging Applications How do we encourage high school students to choose a computer science degree? In this paper we describe a general framework for building short-courses designed to engage student while presenting a sub-field of computer science. We also describe two of these short-courses centered around computer graphics and physical simulations. We take advantage of the ease with wich computer science allows even beginner students to apply and experiment with their knowledge thanks to interactive environments.

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    • exhibitor - A Novel Junior Transition Course for Students of Applied Information Technology
      A Novel Junior Transition Course for Students of Applied Information Technology An overview of a new junior transition course offered to undergraduate students in the Bachelor of Science in Applied Information Technology is presented. The main objective of the course is to guide students to make informed decisions when choosing an area of focus that best suits their interest and abilities. Other aspects include providing general information on the program, ensuring that students get the proper advising that they need, bringing awareness ...

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    • exhibitor - Introductory Computing Course Content: Educator and Student Perspectives
      Introductory Computing Course Content: Educator and Student Perspectives Selecting the appropriate content for introductory computing courses is an important part of attracting and retaining students in computer related education programs. This paper reports the results of an educator survey including SIGCSE and SIGITE members designed to evaluate topics that member institutions currently include and would prefer to include in their introductory computing courses notably for non-majors. In addition, we contrast information ...

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    • exhibitor - Computational Thinking in a Game Design Course
      Computational Thinking in a Game Design Course As a part of an NSF-funded project to enhance computational thinking in undergraduate general education courses, activities and assessments were developed for a game design course taught at DePaul University. The focus of the course is on game analysis and design, but the course textbook uses an approach that is heavily grounded in computational thinking principles. We describe the course activities and assignments and discuss an initial assessment of those materials. Our results show that there is a gap in ...

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    • exhibitor - Motivations and Informing Frameworks of Game Degree Programs in the United Kingdom and the United States
      Motivations and Informing Frameworks of Game Degree Programs in the United Kingdom and the United States The rise of games in the marketplace has resulted in a birth of a number of academic institutions establishing game degree programs. These programs vary and their bent may be entirely technical, like those based on a more traditional computer science program, or may be less technical and more focused on design and creativity. Unlike more established fields where information sharing is the norm, the newness of game degree programs means there is less information ...

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    • exhibitor - Engaging Game Design Students Using Peer Evaluation
      Engaging Game Design Students Using Peer Evaluation Many information technology educators have worked in recent years to develop courses to attract students to the field. As faculty achieve success with technical courses designed to be appeal to a broad audience, it can be hard to maintain the initial excitement particularly as multiple sections of the courses are taught on a continuing basis. In this article we describe a project that added peer evaluation to an assessment in a game design course with a large non-major audience. While controversial, peer evaluation has shown some promise in ...

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    • exhibitor - Applying CPR to the Teaching of IT Ethics
      Applying CPR to the Teaching of IT Ethics An approach typical of philosophers teaching introductory ethics is to immediately introduce students to competing theories and approaches. Unfortunately, this approach has the risk of bewildering students and occupying much course time. Conversely, using an artificially narrowed and prescribed approach to teaching IT ethics such as professional codes of ethics or historical case studies does not do justice to the topic or to the students. Here the student may end up with a good appreciation of codes or cases, but little grounding in philosophical thought. In seeking a middle ground, we suggest a simplified framework that captures important elements of multiple ethical theories while still allowing students to use a unitary conceptual framework in ethical decision-making. This approach, conveniently labeled the CPR Framework, includes the three elements of Character, Principles, and Results. This framework can be used by students both in class and later in their professional careers.

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    • exhibitor - A Student’s Perspective on The Importance of Teaching Social Issues in the I.T. Curriculum
      A Student’s Perspective on The Importance of Teaching Social Issues in the I.T. Curriculum With the rapid growth and popularity of information technology in our society, societal issues as they pertain to IT have become a key component of the IT model curriculum. Mount Royal University offers a course titled ‘Information Technology and Society’ which enables students to gain an understanding about how the technology they use affects society as a whole in positive and negative manners. This paper provides a student’s perspective on the effectiveness of this course. In addition, this paper provides the argument for the incorporation of a dedicated course on social issues pertaining to technology in IT curriculums.

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    • exhibitor - Integrating Mobile Web Development into IT curriculum
      Integrating Mobile Web Development into IT curriculum Recently, the use of mobile phones to access the web has increased exponentially. This technological shift has created a growing demand for mobile website developers in the IT market. To reflect on this recurring demand, the skills taught for an IT undergraduate in a web related course need to take this topic into consideration. In this paper we present our experience in implementing a module on mobile website design and development in an advanced web technologies course. We also report the results obtained from implementing the module in terms of students' feedback and final remarks.

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    • exhibitor - Teaching Web Development at a Distance
      Teaching Web Development at a Distance Distance education (DE) is proliferating with no signs of slowing down. This paper aims to fill the gap of lacking literature by providing instructional details of teaching a Web development course in the format of asynchronous DE and offering practical instructional strategies. The unique contribution of this paper lies in exemplifying the online delivery of a highly technical course that has been traditionally taught in face-to-face settings, as well as the application of problem-based learning (PBL) methods to DE.

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    • exhibitor - Developing IP Telephony Laboratory and Curriculum with Private Cloud Computing
      Developing IP Telephony Laboratory and Curriculum with Private Cloud Computing Internet Protocol (IP) Telephony is growing rapidly in the telecommunication industry. Since IP Telephony curriculum is very new to IT education and also because of the high cost of laboratory equipment, there are very few universities that offer IP Telephony courses. The documentation on IP Telephony laboratory and curriculum is also under-developed. To meet the challenges of this new technology and the needs of IT students, in this paper, we explore how an IT Telephony laboratory can be built upon within the private cloud to serve the class. We believe the lectures and hands-on experience provided by an IP Telephony course help the students gain the knowledge and skills in the areas of configuring an IP Telephony system. This research can serve as a reference guide for other IT educators who want to deploy IP Telephony laboratory and curriculum in their institutions.

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    • exhibitor - The Role of Cyber-Security in Information Technology Education
      The Role of Cyber-Security in Information Technology Education This paper discusses the role of cyber-security in an IT education context and explains why IT programs should champion this topic. The relationship between Information Assurance and Security as a currently recognized discipline within IT and advanced cyber-security topics are presented. Recommendations for the placement and structure of a cyber-security emphasis within a curriculum are presented using an adaptable framework that we have named “Prepare, Defend, Act”. We rationalize and discuss this framework along with teaching methods we have found to be effective in helping students maximize their cyber-security learning experience. Finally, four recommendations are proposed that we invite IT program-offering institutions to review.

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    • exhibitor - An Assessment Framework for Identifying Information Technology Bachelor Programs
      An Assessment Framework for Identifying Information Technology Bachelor Programs What is an IT Bachelor program and how can one be identified? The ACM has recommended approved minimum requirements for IT undergraduate curriculum since 2008. ABET has been accrediting programs offering IT majors since 2006. However, IT programs have been hard to identify for several reasons. They are not always titled “Information Technology”. They are housed in various colleges and schools – such as engineering, business, computing, and information science. Also, they may not have associated themselves with ABET or ACM so these programs may not be accredited. We have undertaken research that uses the ACM IT 2008 model curriculum to identify the “fit” between those minimum criteria and published university undergraduate curriculum regardless of the title, college, or professional association of the program. This paper will present the criteria we propose to use as we attempt to identify all the 4-year IT programs in the USA.

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    • exhibitor - A Competency Based Approach to Developing Articulation Agreements in Computing
      A Competency Based Approach to Developing Articulation Agreements in Computing Projected enrollment in Pennsylvania high schools is expected to continue to decline over the next 10 to 15 years. Additionally, current economic and budget constraints are encouraging students to consider community colleges as the beginning of their baccalaureate degree programs. This increases the pressure on four-year colleges and universities to increase their recruiting efforts to attract community college transfer students. Articulation agreements are the traditional mechanism used to define and formalize the transfer process. In this paper we discuss a process for creating articulation agreements that expands the scope of programs transferring into a four-year degree. In particular we will discuss the effort to recruit students into a four-year Information Assurance and Security program. We will discuss the development of the methodology, the process currently used by the college for developing agreements, and the results of the effort.

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    • exhibitor - Computing Faculty Tenure and Promotion Requirements at U.S. and Canadian Post-Secondary Institutions
      Computing Faculty Tenure and Promotion Requirements at U.S. and Canadian Post-Secondary Institutions In this study, we address the question of what tenure and promotion requirements for computing faculty exist at U.S. and Canadian institutions. Via a survey sent to approximately 7500 computing faculty at the 256 institutions on the Forsythe list that forms the basis of the annual Taulbee Survey, we examined characteristics of and differences in promotion and tenure requirements at U.S. and Canadian institutions. Our results identify several hidden tenure/promotion requirements that can be important for computing faculty to know. Our results also show significant differences in requirements for the number of publications, venue ranking and scope, refereed conferences and non-refeered journals, and collaborative publications and grants across various types of instititutions. This work provides a basis for further study of whether faculty receive support congruent with their promotion and tenure requirements.

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    • exhibitor - Even so with the pieces borrowed from others: Dressing an IS program in IT clothing
      Even so with the pieces borrowed from others: Dressing an IS program in IT clothing This paper describes the background, the decision-making processes, and the curricular philosophy of a new four-year degree in the Computer Science & Information Systems department at Mount Royal University. The program created could be described as a hybrid between the Information Systems 2002 Model Curriculum and the Information Technology 2008 Curriculum Guidelines (IT2008). The approach described here may be of interest to other departments with existing IS programs that would like to take advantage of the strengths of the IT approach without abandoning some of the unique strengths of the IS curricula. The paper also argues that instead of trying to erect clear disciplinary boundaries around IT, we should instead think of IT as the computing discipline whose focus is the practical integration of the other computing disciplines.

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    • exhibitor - Informatics Minor for Non-Computing Students
      Informatics Minor for Non-Computing Students The Rochester Institute of Technology’s School of Informatics has developed a minor in Applied Informatics that allows non-computing students from throughout the university to learn problem solving, data retrieval, and information processing and presentation skills so that they can be productive knowledge workers in the 21st century. The minor is strongly problem-oriented with students being taught how to apply deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning, as well as fundamental information technology skills, to problems in their specific domains. It is the coursework’s relevance and applicability to the students’ majors that eases the acquisition of these skills.

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    • exhibitor - The 2+2 Bachelor of Applied Science in Information Technology Follow-up 2 years Later - Dealing With Challenges
      The 2+2 Bachelor of Applied Science in Information Technology Follow-up 2 years Later – Dealing With Challenges One of the tasks that most universities face is the problem of transfer credits for students coming from other schools. This is particularly problematic with students who attend accredited two year technical schools and receive an AAS or AAT degree. Our university created an articulation agreement with technical two year colleges who offer AAS degrees in computing fields. This paper will examine the challenges, particularly credit evaluation and advising, that have occurred over the last two years. The paper discusses the challenges and how the department has solved them.

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    • exhibitor - The Georgia WebBSIT: Profile of an Online Student Reexamined
      The Georgia WebBSIT: Profile of an Online Student Reexamined This paper is a follow-up to a 2009 paper reporting the development of a profile of students in the Georgia Web Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (Georgia WebBSIT), a fully online baccalaureate degree program jointly developed and offered presently by six institutions within the University System of Georgia (USG). The program enrolled its first students in August 2004 and saw its first graduates in May 2008. The profile developed in 2009 was based upon demographic and performance data. The following expands the profile primarily through the use of a survey of students who have ever taken classes in the program through the report of some additional demographic data as well as perceptions. The objective is to better understand why some students are successful completing the program and why others are not.

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    • exhibitor - Impact of Student Training on the Perceived Ease of Use and Ease of Navigation of a Learning Management System
      Impact of Student Training on the Perceived Ease of Use and Ease of Navigation of a Learning Management System The impact of training for a new Learning Management System (LMS) was examined in this action research project. The study surveyed students (n=276) and determined that training did not affect the students’ perceived ease of use of the LMS. The time to complete the training was significantly lower (m = 35.54) than estimated (2 hours), and it was concluded that online training may not be an effective intervention to improve technology use and adoption for a younger demographic. An unanticipated result of the study was that students grossly over-reported completion of training, and this may be confirmation that survey fatigue is growing among the younger demographic. Over-reporting may be worthy of future study.

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    • exhibitor - SAVI: A new system for Advanced SQL Visualization
      SAVI: A new system for Advanced SQL Visualization In this paper, we present SAVI, a new system for supporting the teaching and the understanding of the semantics of the SQL language. SAVI uses visualization to explain the way some of the SQL operators select and transform data from a target database. The contribution of our paper is two-fold. From a conceptual point of view, we improve the visualization approach provided by existing systems, in order to address the mental visualization problem faced by students when learning SQL. From a technological point of view, we leverage on emerging web technologies to develop a visualization infrastructure that can be seamlessly run on any standard HTML5-capable browser, without any need for an additional software or virtual machine installation.

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    • exhibitor - Databases in the Cloud: a Status Report
      Databases in the Cloud: a Status Report This paper updates an earlier paper on the use of cloud computing in a database course. That paper described a curricular initiative in cloud computing intended to keep our information technology curriculum at the forefront of technology. Currently, our IT degrees offer extensive database concentrations. This paper reports on the results of two years experience using the cloud for lab exercises in the Database Architecture and Implementation course. It discusses the benefits and concludes with a new deployment for the cloud that improves disaster planning for the environment and provides an extension to another campus. We also discuss our Cloud Vendor Selection Model showing how the different services interact with each other. We also show how different categories of users can be supported by different tools to meet course objectives. Finally, we discuss various issues and challenges that must be considered when implementing cloud solutions into an educational environment.

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    • exhibitor - Introducing Cloud Computing with a Senior Design Project in Undergraduate Education of Computer System and Network Administration
      Introducing Cloud Computing with a Senior Design Project in Undergraduate Education of Computer System and Network Administration With the rapid growth of operating cloud computing platforms and their user community, it is desirable to incorporate the management and administration of cloud computing into the curriculum of IT education to meet the needs of relevant industry and users. It is challenging to teach cloud computing in a regular IT course with hands-on activities due to a various reasons including the lack of equipments and software to build a cloud. In the last two semesters, we incorporated cloud computing into our curriculum through a senior project. Two real-world clouds were built by integrating various free software units. Through this project, the students learned the basic concepts and knowledge of cloud computing. The students and faculty gained experiences with deploying, configuring and integrating real-world clouds. In this paper, we present these two clouds and discuss the experiences we gained and the lessons we learned through this project.

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    • exhibitor - Implementing IT0/CS0 with Scratch, App Inventor for Android, and Lego Mindstorms
      Implementing IT0/CS0 with Scratch, App Inventor for Android, and Lego Mindstorms The trend of declining enrollment and interest in computing fields, combined with increased demand from the industry, challenges instructors to come up with new, fresh and appealing methodologies to attract and retain students. Further, with the diffusion of information and computing technologies into almost all fields of study, introductory computing courses for non-majors need approaches that motivate students to feel comfortable with the life-long learning of computing concepts and tools. The goal of this paper is to summarize our teaching experience blending the aforementioned two needs into one course that may be considered as a type of CS0/IT0 course. With the pedagogical underpinnings stemming from constructionist learning and contextualized computing education, we present our motivation and the details of a course that uses the Scratch programming language, App Inventor for Android, and Lego Minstorm robotics.

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    • exhibitor - A minimal, extensible, drag-and-drop implementation of the C programming language
      A minimal, extensible, drag-and-drop implementation of the C programming language Block languages are visual programming languages based on the metaphor of programming bricks. Block languages such as Scratch, are becoming fundamental tools to get children interested in computer programming. These environments and environments derived from them, such as BYOB, have all the features needed to be strong candidates for introductory computer science courses and are starting to be used in some introductory university courses. Nonetheless, some computer science educators at college and university level feel that block languages are too toylike to be used in regular computer science curricula. Standard programming languages, such as C or Java, are still thought of as more appropriate. In this work I will describe a third way to programming languages that can be used for introductory computer science: the visual implementations of relevant subsets of standard programming languages. An initial evaluation showing excellent student acceptance is reported in this paper.

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    • exhibitor - Teaching Garbage Collection with Open Source Virtual Machine
      Teaching Garbage Collection with Open Source Virtual Machine Garbage collection is an integral and fundamental component of every modern memory-managed programming language platform such as Java and Microsoft .Net. Yet, few Computer Science and Information Technology programs offer students a course on garbage collection. High tech companies wish that their new employees knew something about garbage collection as this would help them with decisions concerning languages that are most appropriate for implementing software solutions on behalf of their clients. To address this limitation, we have created a junior level undergraduate garbage collection course that gives students practical experience in exploring, designing, and implementing garbage collection algorithms in the context of an open source virtual machine. We have taught this course twice and on both occasions students were pleased with their learning experience.

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    • exhibitor - Multimedia-Based Visual Programming Promoting Core Competencies in IT Education
      Multimedia-Based Visual Programming Promoting Core Competencies in IT Education Programming constitutes one of the core competencies demanded of any IT education. However, some students within certain specializations of this diverse discipline are inclined to question the need for programming. The use of a visual programming environment in the development of interactive multimedia applications can serve the dual purposes of getting students excited about programming and giving them the core knowledge they need. ...

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    • exhibitor - Visualizing the Modern Operating System: Simulation Experiments Supporting Enhanced Learning
      Visualizing the Modern Operating System: Simulation Experiments Supporting Enhanced Learning An important area of modern computer organization and architecture is the operating system the internals of which is normally inaccessible for teaching and learning purposes. This paper describes an educational operating system simulator that is part of an integrated set of simulators designed to support students of computer architecture and operating systems. ...

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    • exhibitor - An Architecture for Delivery of Distance Education in Developing Countries
      An Architecture for Delivery of Distance Education in Developing Countries In the face of the slow growth of education in developing nations, Distance Education (DE) can be leveraged to boost literacy rates there. Classroom instructional resource and teaching staff shortages are prime contributing factors to this slow growth. Research shows DE instruction is as effective as traditional classroom instruction: students learn as much, if not more, via DE as they do in classrooms. ...

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    • exhibitor - Teaching Enterprise Application Development: Strategies and Challenge
      Teaching Enterprise Application Development: Strategies and Challenge Enterprise application development requires a skill set that is broader than that provided by traditional programming courses. Enterprise applications are distributed, networked, multi-user, and architecturally complex. Enterprise developers must possess knowledge of a programming language as well as ancillary concepts such as networking, application security, RDBMS’s, concurrency, deployment and scaling. ...

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    • exhibitor - Teaching Natural User Interaction Using OpenNI and the Microsoft Kinect Sensor
      Teaching Natural User Interaction Using OpenNI and the Microsoft Kinect Sensor The launch of the Microsoft Kinect for Xbox (a real-time 3D imaging device) and supporting libraries has spurred a flurry of development of, among other things, natural user interfaces for computer applications. Using Kinect offers opportunities for novel approaches to classroom instruction on natural user interaction. With the launch of this sensor came the establishment of development platforms that are able to collect and process the data that this sensor provides ...

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    • exhibitor - Teaching Innovation-On-Demand in an Undergraduate Information Technology Program
      Teaching Innovation-On-Demand in an Undergraduate Information Technology Program Innovative Problem Solving is a methodology for developing incremental improvements, or innovations, for any type of system. IPS represents a powerful critical and alternative thinking skill we wish to instill in every graduate of the Bachelor of Arts in Information Management & Systems program at the University of South Carolina Upstate. A new three credit hour course teaching IPS, called SIMS 307: Systematic Innovation ...

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    • exhibitor - A Health IT Application Domain Course for a Traditional IT Program
      A Health IT Application Domain Course for a Traditional IT Program IT2008 specifically mentioned health care as an area of probable interest for “application domain classes”. This paper documents our initial foray into providing a domain specific course in Health Information Technology (HIT) for Seniors in an IT Program. Studies estimate tens of thousands of IT professional will be needed in the coming years in the United States alone. However, most of the “health informatics” courses currently in academic curriculum are offered in health science programs targeted for future health care professionals who are IT users. ...

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    • exhibitor - Information Technology for Continuous Patient Health Education
      Information Technology for Continuous Patient Health Education Information technology for continuous patient health education and counseling could be a powerful means for health promotion and disease prevention. We developed a universal platform for Individualized Continuous Patient Education (iCOPE). This platform is a comprehensive informatics framework for rapid adaptation and dissemination of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) products tailored to different categories of health consumers including difficult-to-reach patients. ...

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    • exhibitor - A Trust-Aware Tag-Based Privacy Control for eHealth 2.0
      A Trust-Aware Tag-Based Privacy Control for eHealth 2.0 Healthcare social networking is an emerging web 2.0 application that promise to bring about a whole revolution in the way that health care is delivered. In healthcare social networks, health information requires extra protection as its disclosure can have serious repercussions in the content owner’s private and professional life. We have developed a prototype of healthcare social network system (called Husky eHealth 2.0) with a trust-aware tag-based privacy control scheme. ...

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    • exhibitor - A Multi-layer Tree Model for Enterprise Vulnerability Management
      A Multi-layer Tree Model for Enterprise Vulnerability Management Conducting enterprise-wide vulnerability assessment (VA) on a regular basis plays an important role in assessing an enterprise’s information system security status. However, an enterprise network is always very complex, separated into different types of zones, and consisting hundreds of hosts in the networks. The complexity of IT system makes VA an extremely time-consuming task for security professionals. They are seeking for an automated tool that helps monitor and manage the overall vulnerability of an enterprise. This paper presents a novel methodology that provides a dashboard solution ...

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    • exhibitor - A Solace in Quantum
      A Solace in Quantum Qubits, Atoms, Photons, Entanglements, Quantum Mechanics and Diamonds meet the Information Age. Current research indicates that diamonds may hold the key to a cryptanalyst’s nightmare, ‘The unbreakable cipher’. This paper introduces the basic theory and principles behind this innovative technology, reports on the research that has led to present day breakthroughs, investigates those that hold promise and looks at the possibilities for future research in this field. This report is presented as a primer to the ‘World of Quantum Cryptography’ ...

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    • exhibitor - Measuring the performance of VoIP over Wireless LAN
      Measuring the performance of VoIP over Wireless LAN IEEE 802.11 wireless local area network (WLAN) has become popular and has been providing excellent solution for wireless networking. With the popularity of WLAN and Voice over the Internet (VoIP) protocol, it is very essential to measure the performance of the VoIP over WLAN. The main goal here is to compare the performance of the Voice over IP protocol in both LAN(802.3) and WLAN(802.11). This paper will examine how this communication protocol will perform in two different network setups and ...

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    • exhibitor - Capstone Experience – Lessons from an Undergraduate Research Group in Speech at UNH Manchester
      Capstone Experience – Lessons from an Undergraduate Research Group in Speech at UNH Manchester In this paper we discuss transforming the newly created Capstone course in Computer Information Systems to mentor students in developing problem solving skills by immersing them in a real world research environment. We use Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) as the field of research, a cutting edge, complex and challenging technology that has a very appealing hands on flavor where students can see tangible results of their work. Students learn to decompose problems, find solutions, self organize and establish leadership roles based on their skill sets and interests. ...

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    • exhibitor - Effects of Communication, Leadership, and Team Performance on Successful IT Capstone Projects: A Case Study
      Effects of Communication, Leadership, and Team Performance on Successful IT Capstone Projects: A Case Study To provide students with the opportunity to synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired from their prior courses into one final project, IT capstone projects have become an essential part of the IT curriculum. This paper presents the successes and challenges from the student groups with post-project survey and student self reflection. ...

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    • exhibitor - Do students have the relevant ICT skills they need to do their research projects?
      Do students have the relevant ICT skills they need to do their research projects? The final year research project is the capstone of undergraduate studies. Finding out the skills students have at final year helps determine how ready they are for their research projects as well as how prepared they are for the job market. In order to ascertain the Information Communication and Technology (ICT) literacy levels of students, a study was carried out using year four (final year) students across several faculties and departments in the University of Botswana using computer self efficacy instrument and Task characteristics. ...

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    • exhibitor - Enhancing Network Security Education with Research and Development Content
      Enhancing Network Security Education with Research and Development Content Network Security (CNT 4403) is an undergraduate course offered for the IT and Computer Science majors at the University of Central Florida. In the recent offering of this course, we enhanced its teaching by adding research-oriented content. In this paper, we discuss our enhancement effort and give two examples. Through our research and graduate teaching, we identified important security aspects ...

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    • exhibitor - Bringing together a Low-Cost Networking Learning Environment
      Bringing together a Low-Cost Networking Learning Environment There are many challenges typically encountered by a tertiary institution setting up applied networking resources. Such labs are necessary to create industry-ready graduates. Smaller institutes face particular issues where they loose the benefit of economies scale. This is because networking resources usually scale particularly well as the number of users increases. This paper considers a wide range of factors that show how a ‘Learning Environment’ is far more than just a computer network. This paper describes a range of elements of the Learning Environment. Each is described fully, then put into context of an overall, ‘living’ environment of many different aspects. There is consideration of a recent, and very exciting, addition to the Environment, then a look at the crystal ball of future directions, and mirror of lessons learned. This paper will contain information useful to anyone managing an applied network lab, or a wider environment for teaching Information Technology courses.

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    • exhibitor - Recruiting and Retaining Women in Information Technology
      Recruiting and Retaining Women in Information Technology This panel will discuss ways to recruit women into our majors as well as factors that have been shown to contribute to them leaving the IT profession. By identifying these factors, hopefully we can address the issues raised and encourage women to stay in information technology.

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    • exhibitor - Free and Open Source Software in Computing Education
      Free and Open Source Software in Computing Education Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) exemplifies the merit and successes of open content, understood broadly as creative work that explicitly allows sharing and further changes by anyone, whether an individual or organization. Although the benefits of improving computing education with open source practices are largely acknowledged, transforming teaching to create effective learning environments has many challenges. The panelists will bring different perspectives on teaching strategies and curricular content they have used in their classrooms. These perspectives will exemplify key issues with FOSS-based education and FOSS-based IT systems. The developer and user communities established around FOSS-based IT systems are of particular interest to the IT discipline because of its focus on user centeredness and advocacy for advancing professional practices in authentic environments.

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    • exhibitor - Community Empowering Service-Learning Courses Through 21st Century Technologies
      Community Empowering Service-Learning Courses Through 21st Century Technologies This panel will include a historical perspective of IT service-learning (SL) courses at a multi-campus university followed by specific descriptions of the challenges and rewards of designing and facilitating courses that foster civic engagement. The courses covered will include the earliest course in the SL repertoire, Computers for Human Empowerment, and a course that helps higher-functioning (less impaired) computer science high school students with disabilities in learning advanced technology skills and life planning and personal productivity skills where assistive communication devices are tailored to each student. Also included will be a discussion of Problem Salving Using LEGO Robotics in which robotics technology is being integrated into science and technology (STEM) courses at the New York School for the Deaf. Intergenerational Computing, which was showcased on CBS News recently, will be highlighted in this panel discussion.

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    • exhibitor - CSTA National Standards and their Impact on the Future of K-12 Computer Education
      CSTA National Standards and their Impact on the Future of K-12 Computer Education The panel will discuss how the revised standards will impact K-12 education and discuss the ways in which educators at all levels (K through College) can help to strengthen computer studies programs in our nations schools. The panel will present information about the revised Model, the role of the CSTA, and the reality of K-12 computer education today. Time will be allotted for discussion and sharing of ideas for making K-12 computer education a reality for all students.

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    • exhibitor - Assessment and Accreditation
      Assessment and Accreditation This panel will feature four speakers with an in-depth knowledge of accreditation and continuous improvement. It will be used both to inform the audience of some of the changes that are likely to occur in IT accreditation criteria in the near future and to seek feedback on specific accreditation-related questions.

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    • Transforming Information Technology Curricula with Innovative Storage & Data Management Teaching Resources
      Transforming Information Technology Curricula with Innovative Storage & Data Management Teaching Resources Please plan to join this session to learn about the new, NetApp Academic Alliances Program, and the innovative teaching resources we can provide to enrich your curricula and your students’ learning opportunities.

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    • EMC Academic Alliance and Tools for Teaching the Information Storage and Management Course
      EMC Academic Alliance and Tools for Teaching the Information Storage and Management Course Learn how you can enhance student career prospects in the world of IT through the EMC Academic Alliance program that provides the technology-based Information Storage and Management (ISM) course. This course covers information storage technologies includ­ing storage networking, business continuity, virtualization, security, and management.

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  • SIGITE 2011

    United States , New York·October 19 - 22, 2011

    The 12th Annual Conference on Information Technology Education will be held at the historic Thayer Hotel, on the grounds of the US Military Academy in West Point, New York.

    register for the event 

     
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